Obama Said Knock You Out by Robt Seda-Schreiber

“Obama Said Knock You Out”
7.25″ x 5.5″
Pen & Ink Drawing

This is free for all to download, print, & disseminate. Go forth & spread the gospel. Put it on every street corner & lamp-post, every bulletin board & kiosk, every juke-joint & house of ill-repute, every cafe, campus & construction site, every church, synagogue, mosque, & Bahá’í Center, every library & schoolyard, every domino table & methadone clinic, every nook & cranny you can find…or… just stick it in your office. 

Remember there’s no knockout in this bout, it goes the full 12 rounds. The judges’ decision is final on 6 November, so get out & vote, my friends.
~ Robt Seda-Schreiber

Mr. Seda-Schreiber tells us that is not a professional artist, but simply an art teacher with a drawing table at which he sometimes sit & create little doodles, surrounded by far too many toys for a man of his age. Should you so desire, you can see more of his artistic shenanigans at sweetestbaboon.blogspot.com.

When I asked for  his twitter handle, this was Mr. Seda-Schreiber’s response:

I’m not on Twitter or Facebook… I actually don’t even text, if you can believe it.
I’m so old school, I make Chuck D look like Meek Mill.

LOL. I was granted permission to quote him on this. Mr. Seda-Schreiber’s “Baby Got Hope” poster was featured in the book, “Design for Obama” during the 2008 campaign season. He’s in it for the long haul. Respect.

Thanks for reading!

~ Onjena

#sayitLOUD #spreadLOVE

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Robt Seda-Schreiberis “an artist, a lover, a father, a teacher, a hustler of culture, an oh-so-tiny & not-so-private dancer, an imaginary boxer, a practicing solipsist, & a self-indulgent, egotistical, totally insecure, anxious & angst-ious little man.” A friend left a beautiful quote about the artist and the art: “Seda-Schreiber lets you into his mind, and it turns out to be a worthwhile place to rummage around… (His work) is like receiving a long letter from a friend you didn’t know you had.” (Cat Yronwode). Sounds like my kinda artist. See more of his works at sweetestbaboon.blogspot.com.

CANVASS 44: Mother Hunger, Art and Perspective and President Obama

“The Problem We All Live With” by Norman Rockwell

“Mother hunger — to be one or have one”

                                                    ~ Toni Morrison

… the desire to protect and be protected…  to be seen as a human worthy to be celebrated… admired…forgiven…

It’s not about celebrating one over another. It’s about equal protection for a chance to get it right… or to get it wrong…

I think President Obama got it right when he honored the bravery of a six year old girl named Ruby Bridges by hanging Norman Rockwell’s painting “The Problem We All Live With” in the White House. Many thought the President got it wrong by choosing to highlight such an “ugly” part of American history. I see the image of Ruby shielded by several U.S. Marshalls and my heart aches and swells with pride. I guess we all have a right to choose what we will never forget…

Perspective…

Here we are in 2012, and some of the American media seems to have a tough time celebrating certain people’s achievements… Sometimes it is just the tone of the reporter… sometimes it is the persistent questioning of mental strength and preparedness… as if to diminish the hard work and mental toughness en route to becoming an Olympic champion twice over… (Thank you Gabby Douglas).

I understand that because Great Britain was the host country of the Olympics, the American media was keen to follow and celebrate their team’s wins (mainly when the American teams were not in medal contention)… however, as a multi-national patriot, I felt something else was going on… An air of exclusion that I have unfortunately grown accustom to…

Who do we readily accept as our heroes? And if someone who looks like Gabby Douglas (or Serena Williams) is that hero… do we explain it away by saying they are exceptions and not the rule (quite different from being exceptional, mind you)…? When the American flag fell during Serena’s medal ceremony, I felt a slight twinge of anxiety for how some would interpret it as a bad sign… But Serena’s response made my heart soar:

“…it was probably flying to come hug me because the flag was so happy.”

                                                                                                             ~ Serena Williams

The flag was not the only happy one, Miss Williams. (And while I’m celebrating Serena’s win, I’d like to congratulate some of my other favorite Olympic athletes… Michael Phelps, Ryan Lochte, Missy Franklin, Allyson Felix, Misty May-Treanor, Kerri Walsh Jennings, Samuel Mikulak and Usain Bolt).

The problems we all live with… we may not agree on what they are or how to solve them, but I can say this… I believe President Obama is the right one to deal with the problems of America.

Having a colorful past is about as American as it gets. (And just an FYI to Team Romney… America’s “shared heritage” expands well beyond the borders of Great Britain…). I designed my first multi-national symbol for my mom’s “seoul food” eatery… but it seems to have resonated with many people… so I designed a few more variations. I am posting it on CANVASS 44…to represent all multi-nationals who support President Obama.

Representing the change in America that  has been here all along… From left to right: Americans from Cape Verde, Israel, Canada, Ghana, Japan, Korea and China. More to come…

A portion of proceeds from all merchandise on the CANVASS 44 store will go to the re-election campaign for President Obama, Partners in Health and the BVSJ.

Please share your art with us in support of the President via twitter @CANVASS44.

Thanks for reading!

~ Onjena

#sayitLOUD #registertovote #neverforget #spreadLOVE

ABOUT RUBY BRIDGES & NORMAN ROCKWELL

Ruby Bridges Hall now serves on the board of Norman Rockwell Museum and founded The Ruby Bridges Foundation in 1999 to promote the values of tolerance, respect, and appreciation of all differences. She commended Rockwell for having “enough courage to step up to the plate and say I’m going to make a statement, and he did it in a very powerful way.”

Norman Rockwell received letters of both praise and criticism for depicting such direct social commentary in his painting “The Problem We All Live With.” Rockwell continued to revisit the theme of civil rights in several other of his illustrations from the period.

*A very special shout out to @problemwthat for encouraging me to share my American story.

CANVASS 44: Barack Black Eagle: He Who Helps People Throughout the Land by Bunky Echo-Hawk

“Barack Black Eagle: He Who Helps People Throughout the Land”

Artist Bunky Echo-Hawk painted this piece live at the Native Nations: Uniting for Change event during the Democratic National Convention in 2008.

Earlier in the year, Huffingtonpost featured this painting with about 10 other pieces describing the works as “bizarre.” Hmmm… “bizarre” or simply misunderstood? The “re-imagination” of popular figures, whether historical or fictional, is actually not that bizarre…

Take a look at the varied representations of Jesus… brunette…blonde… brown eyes… blue eyes… wooly hair… flowing locks… “swarthy”… white skin… If you ask most people what the founder of Buddhism looks like, most would describe a smiling jolly and bald Chinese man.

And no, this “bizarre” phenomenon is not limited to religious figures… Have you seen an American movie in the past few years or, oh wait, since Hollywood began producing movies, be it original or remakes? Ironically, the most recent “backlash” against the “re-imagination” of a character was aimed at a young character named “Rue” in “The Hunger Games.” (FYI. It wasn’t Rue’s characterization that was wrong, but the imagination of many of the viewers/readers…).

I can feel the eyes roll… How fitting that I reference religious figures and Hollywood when Obama has been “accused” of being a fake messiah and a “celebrity.”

What I see is positive change… a shift in deep-rooted underlying assumptions that are being challenged more frequently and by many different voices. I read an article in February about the “Linsanity” phenomenom by Yellow Peril that described Jeremy Lin as an “Asian Obama.” Robert Deniro recently came under fire for a joke about it being too soon for a “White First Lady.”

Thank you Bunky Echo-Hawk, for sharing your perspective on how our heroes can capture our collective imaginations…

Bizarre? No. Assumptions challenged. Yes.

And what exactly is “flesh-colored” anyway…?

Proceeds from the sale of Barack Black Eagle prints will be shared with Organizing for America and NVision. NVision is a movement  that is “committed to the development of Native youth leadership and traditional and contemporary expressions of art, culture, education, and media from a Native core and perspective.”

Thanks for reading!

~ Onjena

#sayitLOUD #registertovote #neverforget #spreadLOVE

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Bunky Echo-Hawk is a multi-talented artist whose work spans both media and lifestyle.  A  graduate of the Institute of American Indian Arts,  he is a fine artist, graphic designer, photographer, writer and a non-profit professional.  He is  also a traditional singer and dancer. Throughout his career, Bunky has merged traditional values with his lifestyle and art.

He has exhibited his work in major exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally in NYC, Chicago, Denver, Santa Fe, and Frank- furt, Germany, to name a few. His poetry has been published in magazines and anthologies throughout the country, and his plays have been performed and produced across the nation. Bunky is also an advocate and an educator. He travels extensively, creating live works of art for auction.

Through his art, Bunky has raised thousands of dollars for several national non-profit organizations. Additionally, he speaks at conferences, conducts workshops, and teaches both art and writing. In 2006, Bunky co-founded NVision, serving as Executive Director until 2009. NVision is a nonprofit collective of Native American artists, musicians, community organizers, and nonprofit professionals who focus on Native American youth empowerment through multimedia arts. Bunky is a 2008 First Peoples Fund Business in Leadership Fellow, a 2008 United States Artist Fellow nominee, a 2008 Joan Mitchell Foundation Fellow nominee, and a 2008 Boulder County Multicultural Award recipient.

CANVASS 44: BAMA Oil Painting by Ragamuffin Arts’ Oneil Maitland

“BAMA” Oil Painting: 16 x 20

“This piece is inspired by the masking or make-up of politics. To always show a person of leadership joyous and heroic is unrealistic. I aim to show a man leading a nation divided by various ideologies. The intense color of the background makes the lone president monumental as is his responsibility.”

~ Oneil Maitland of Ragamuffin Arts

Proceeds from the sale of “BAMA” will benefit Organizing for America and Africa-Diaspora Partnership For Empowerment & Development Inc (ADPED).  The ADPED is a not-for profit organization with membership from people of all nationalities, creed, and gender, who are bound together by a strong commitment to empowering people of Africa and the Diaspora to achieve community-led, self-reliant, sustainable livelihood and development.

Please contact the artist, Oneil Maitland at ragamuffin.arts(at)gmail.com for inquiries regarding “BAMA.”

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Oneil Maitland is a Caribbean American artist and animator whose work feature a versatile approach with communicating the traditional aspects of fine arts with an urban contemporary allure. Maitland attended the New World School of the Arts majoring in drawing/painting and electronic media. His art style is bold, intense,and vibrant but yet leaves room for sensitivity to what must come next… life. The content of the artist’s work ranges from social, political and cultural identity.

CANVASS 44: Wet Paint by Andre Woolery : The Canvas is Not Yet Dry : 44th and 1st

Wet Paint by Andre Woolery

“Wet Paint”

“Some choices we live not only once but a thousand times over,
remembering them for the rest of our lives.”

~ Richard Bach

“The Obama presidency means many different things to many different people,
but it will not be capable of a complete evaluation until many decades later.
Despite varying opinions the numbers will always ring true: 44th and 1st.”

~ Andre Woolery

Since 2008, many of us voted for then Senator Obama and have continued to support the President as he makes many difficult decisions on our behalf. And others, well, while we engage and respectfully debate the chronic nay-sayers, CANVASS 44 is not about that, but about celebrating and supporting President Obama.

The writing is not yet on the wall as for how the President has performed in his first term. But over 9,000 thumbtacks are on a canvas, thanks to Andre Woolery. Over 9,000 decisions to tell a story of inspiration and determination that is not unique to the subject, nor the artist, but representative of all of us who work hard, in short, to pursue happiness.

If we all had a cumulative record of the result of the many decisions we made each day, what would it look like? “Wet Paint” captures the warmth and humility of the most powerful man in the world. You can’t fake that.

For those in New York during February 23rd and March 1st, Andre will be exhibiting “Wet Paint” with his other works at Frontrunner Gallery.

The title of Andre’s solo exhibit, “Bruised Thumbs.” :0)
ABOUT THE ARTIST

Born in Jamaica and raised in New Jersey, Andre Woolery creates art that is accessible and reflective of his journey. His work was recently profiled in Black Enterprise and Complex Magazine. Read his full story at www.andrewooleryart.com and follow him on twitter, @undre2g.

CANVASS 44: Excerpts from an “INSIDE LOOK: Grey Williamson and the Making of the Renegade Obama Bust”

CARBON-FIBRE MEDIA (CFM): WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO DO A BUST OF PRESIDENT OBAMA?

GREY WILLIAMSON: After Barack Obama became President, it started. I watched as an unprecedented attempt at dehumanization took place with no respect for the man or the office that he held. I had seen these types of attacks before… I knew what they felt like.

History revealed that neither Malcolm X nor MLK had aspirations toward fame and fortune. Neither actively sought personal recognition. But when faced with extreme adversity they were forced to make choices of character.

It’s then that their greatness expressed itself. It was then that their true selves were revealed… and the hero emerged.

Seeing President Obama under monstrous but familiar assault, I respected the power of the moment and decided to bear witness to it…

I was struck by the strength he displayed, maintaining his character in the face of hate. I wanted to communicate how I was affected by that strength and the intensity of focus… I felt like he was fighting my fight… carrying my weight. So, I wanted to give something in return. The best that I have is my art…

Artwork becomes a part of history. Because of my ability and the uniqueness of my perspective, I couldn’t wait for someone else to capture what was happening at this time. I wanted to do my part.

Ogi Gogi Bot Ogi Gogi Bot

CFM: HOW DID YOU SETTLE ON THIS DESIGN… HIS EXPRESSION… HIS POSTURE…?

GREY: I wanted to portray the inner qualities of the man. I asked myself how does his wife see him, because she married him… how does a wife want to see her husband. I tried to stay true to that.

I selected the posture of a boxer because he is currently engaged in the fight of his life. His pose is reminiscent of the fighting style of Muhammad Ali, Floyd Mayweather or someone like that.

Aim High Bot

CFM: SOME MIGHT SAY “RENEGADE” IS AN APPROPRIATE NAME FOR THE BUST SINCE PRESIDENT OBAMA HAS BROUGHT “UNWANTED” CHANGE TO AMERICA. WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS?

GREY: I would say that change here more represents growth and progress. I don’t believe that people, in general, object to that, they just don’t want the pain often associated with it. Although I am not responsible for that moniker being placed on him, I chose it for the bust for what it could mean as a statement against the conventional thinking of the “old guard” who still believe that extreme separation between the classes still serves them.

I believe that the Obama presidency represents a paradigm shift, a “change” in perception… the effects of which will be felt beyond our lifetimes.

Read the full interview on Carbon-Fibre Media’s blog, The Ethyr.

Additional pictures of the Renegade Obama bust can be viewed on Carbon-Fibre Media’s showcase.

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Grey Williamson has worked as a writer, artist and designer for almost every major comic publisher in the comic industry. He formed Carbon-Fibre Media as a home for his entertainment properties and productions.

Kilroy III makes his professional debut at Carbon-Fibre Media with his work on the Apollo, Val-Mar and Renegade busts. He has multiple projects under development that can be viewed on his blog, Kilroy’s Attic.

Obamabot 2.0: First of Many, Optimist Prime, Hana Hou, Obamanator

Presenting… Obamabot 2.0 aka Operation Co-Opt. We, “Obamabots” support our President, not out of blind faith, but out of a foundation of trust. So call us what you will… We know it’s bigger than politics…

Here are some designs of the Obamabot collectible toy… coming soon.

The first of many…

First of Many

First of Many

For the eternal optimist…

Optimist Prime :: Obamabot 2.0

Optimist Prime

And the skeptics among us…

Skeptical :: Obamabot 2.0

Skeptical

“Hana Hou” is a common Hawaiian expression meaning “One more time!”

Hana Hou:: Obamabot 2.0

Hana Hou

He’ll be back…

Obamanator:: Obamabot 2.0

Obamanator

DIYs will be available too so you can customize your own Obamabot toy to fit your botitude.

All designs are available on t-shirts and various accessories on our CANVASS 44 store for the benefit of Organizing for America, Partners in Health and BVSJ.

Thanks for reading!

~ Onjena

#sayitLOUD #registertovote #spreadLOVE

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Onjena makes her professional debut at Carbon-Fibre Media with her line of toy robots called “O’BOTS” and a line of political t-shirts for CANVASS 44. She is also an amateur scrapbooker. 

Eric Nocella Diaz, under his company, GoldMane Entertainment, in addition to publishing comic books and graphic novels, develops prototype sculptures, maquettes, statues, busts, designer resin collectibles and toys.